X-Ray Results

Radiology 

What is Radiology?

Radiology is a branch of medicine that uses imaging technology to diagnose and treat disease. Radiology may be divided into two different areas, diagnostic radiology and interventional radiology. Doctors who specialize in radiology are called radiologists.

Radiology is used for a wide range of conditions, and is classified depending on the type of radiology and the exact imaging test used. The various imaging exams include:

  • Radiographs: X-rays to look at bones, the chest or the abdomen.

  • CT (Computed Tomography): A CT captures multiple x-ray angles of the patient using a doughnut-shaped machine, then creates computer-processed images.

  • MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging): An MRI uses magnetic fields and radio waves with computer processing to create images.

  • Mammograms: Specially powered x-rays that look at breast tissues.

  • Ultrasound: An ultrasound uses sound waves to create moving images that display on a monitor, commonly used for echocardiograms and examining the womb during pregnancy.

  • Fluoroscopy: X-rays that make moving images of the body in real time. This imaging is crucial for many procedures, especially those involving the gastrointestinal tract.

  • Nuclear medicine: These are short-acting radioactive substances that generate light from bodily processes. A camera collects the light, so a computer can process it and develop an image.

Dr. Joshua Holliday, MD

(641) 782-3508

Radiology Center

X-Ray

X-rays can help doctors diagnose things like:

  • Broken bones

  • Dislocated joints

  • Arthritis

  • Abdominal pain, in some instances

  • Cancer

  • Tooth decay

X-rays are images that use a small doses of ionized radiation to take pictures of the inside of your body called radiographs.

3D Mammography

3D mammography is an FDA-approved advanced technology that takes multiple images, or X-rays, of breast tissue to recreate a 3-dimensional picture of the breast. You may also hear it called breast tomosynthesis. It's different from traditional mammography In that traditional mammography obtains just a single image. Like traditional mammography, 3D mammography uses X-rays to produce images of breast tissue in order to detect lumps, tumors or other abnormalities, 3D captures multiple slices of the breast, all at different angles. The images are brought together to create crystal clear 3D reconstruction of the breast

Ultrasound

Ultrasound is a useful way of examining many of the body's internal organs, including but not limited to the:

  • heart and blood vessels, including the abdominal aorta and its major branches

  • liver

  • gallbladder

  • spleen

  • pancreas

  • kidneys

  • bladder

  • uterus, ovaries, and unborn child (fetus) in pregnant patients

PET Scan

Before having a PET/CT scan, the patient receives a dose of a radio-pharmaceutical tracer containing substances that mimic those normally used in the body including water, sugar, proteins, and oxygen. These tracers accumulate in diseased cells. During the scan, the tracers are detected by the system creating an image of the patient and highlighting any abnormal physiology. This image helps our physicians determine if disease is present, the location and extent of disease, and track how rapidly it is spreading.

Nuclear Medicine

Nuclear medicine is a specialized area of radiology that uses very small amounts of radioactive materials, or radiopharmaceuticals, to examine organ function and structure. Nuclear medicine imaging is a combination of many different disciplines. These include chemistry, physics, mathematics, computer technology, and medicine. This branch of radiology is often used to help diagnose and treat abnormalities very early in the progression of a disease, such as thyroid cancer

MRI

Magnetic resonance imaging is a medical imaging technique used in radiology to form pictures of the anatomy and the physiological processes of the body. MRI scanners use strong magnetic fields, magnetic field gradients, and radio waves to generate images of the organs in the body.

CT Scan

CT scans can detect bone and joint problems, like complex bone fractures and tumors. If you have a condition like cancer, heart disease, emphysema, or liver masses, CT scans can spot it or help doctors see any changes. They show internal injuries and bleeding, such as those caused by a car accident. During a CT scan, you lie in a tunnel-like machine while the inside of the machine rotates and takes a series of X-rays from different angles. These pictures are then sent to a computer, where they're combined to create images of slices, or cross-sections, of the body.

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Being able to help people is one of my favorite things about my job. This is truly rewarding.

Joshua Holliday, MD