Getting Your Flu Vaccine at Our Facilities

Getting a flu vaccine is more important than ever during 2020-2021 to protect yourself and the people around you from flu, and to help reduce the strain on healthcare systems responding to the COVID-19 pandemic. Read below to see your options for where to get your flu shot.

Union County Public Health Flu Clinic

Tuesdays from October 6th - November 24th

12 - 6 p.m.

Greater Regional Public Health Building 801 Wyoming Avenue, Creston, IA

Make an appointment by calling (641) 745-0124.

$39.00

Also available: Prevnar and Pneumovax

Please wear a mask when coming in for your flu shot.

Greater Regional Primary Care Clinics

primary care clinic & new life family medicine

Starting October 5th

Monday - Friday

8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Medical Arts Plaza

No appointment needed for established patients.

$39.00

Please wear a mask when coming in for your flu shot.

rural health clinics

Starting October 5th

During regular clinic hours

No appointment needed for established patients.

Corning Medical Clinic

Lenox Medical Clinic

Mt. Ayr Community Health Clinic

$39.00

Please wear a mask when coming in for your flu shot.

Flu Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions

Why should people get vaccinated against flu?

Influenza is a potentially serious disease that can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death. Every flu season is different, and influenza infection can affect people differently, but millions of people get flu every year, hundreds of thousands of people are hospitalized and thousands to tens of thousands of people die from flu-related causes every year. An annual seasonal flu vaccine is the best way to help protect against flu. Vaccination has been shown to have many benefits including reducing the risk of flu illnesses, hospitalizations and even the risk of flu-related death in children.

 

How do flu vaccines work?

Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are used to make the vaccine.

 

When should I get vaccinated?

You should get a flu vaccine before flu viruses begin spreading in your community, since it takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection against flu. Make plans to get vaccinated early in fall, before flu season begins. CDC recommends that people get a flu vaccine by the end of October. However, getting vaccinated early is likely to be associated with reduced protection against flu infection later in the flu season, particularly among older adults. Vaccination should continue to be offered throughout the flu season, even into January or later. Children who need two doses of vaccine to be protected should start the vaccination process sooner, because the two doses must be given at least four weeks apart.

 

Why do I need a flu vaccine every year?

A flu vaccine is needed every season for two reasons. First, a person’s immune protection from vaccination declines over time, so an annual vaccine is needed for optimal protection. Second, because flu viruses are constantly changing, flu vaccines may be updated from one season to the next to protect against the viruses that research suggests may be most common during the upcoming flu season. For the best protection, everyone 6 months and older should get vaccinated annually.

Does a flu vaccine increase your risk of getting COVID-19?

There is no evidence that getting a flu vaccine increases your risk of getting sick from a coronavirus, like the one that causes COVID-19. Getting a flu vaccine is more important than ever during 2020-2021 to protect yourself and the people around you from flu, and to help reduce the strain on healthcare systems responding to the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

What protection does a flu vaccine provide if I do get sick with flu?

Some people who get vaccinated may still get sick. However, flu vaccination has been shown in some studies to reduce severity of illness in people who get vaccinated but still get sick. A 2017 study showed that flu vaccination reduced deaths, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, ICU length of stay, and overall duration of hospitalization among hospitalized adults with flu. Another study in 2018 showed that a vaccinated adult who was hospitalized with flu was 59 percent less likely to be admitted to the ICU than someone who had not been vaccinated. Among adults in the ICU with flu, vaccinated patients on average spent 4 fewer days in the hospital than those who were not vaccinated.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Greater Regional Health

1700 W. Townline St.

Creston, Iowa 50801

(641) 782-7091

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Videographer: Dustin Baird

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