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Why Vaccinate?

Greater Regional Health can assist in helping patients and their families may be seeking vaccinations through a range of provider visits whether pediatrics, family medicine, or our Public Health resources.

Union County Public Health office can provide information related to vaccination recommendation or consider making an appointment with your primary provider to assist in review of medical immunizations records and information regarding the most up-to-date vaccinations to be offered. On-time vaccination throughout childhood is essential in helping provide immunity before children are exposed to potentially life-threatening diseases. Vaccines are tested to ensure that they are safe and effective for children to receive at the recommended ages throughout their lifespan.

You're never too old to get vaccinated! Vaccinating is a lifelong, life-protecting, job. Leaving your healthcare provider's office, asking if you've had all the vaccinations you need, is never a bad idea. Providers can consult with you to determine level of risk for infection and your need for vaccination.

The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services shared their reasons to vaccinate children through the comparison of parental desire to provide the best resources and safest version of accessories through means of research and reviews. Just as parents spend time finding the safest rated car seats, instilling home safety precautions like baby gates and cabinet latches, protecting a child is just the same when considering vaccinations so research is encouraged.

Considering the impact of a vaccination from a positive impact aspect is the protection it provides your child when entering a public facility such as childcare or other public environments. Vaccination is the preventative measure that can make the difference when germs are encountered. As well as encouraging hygienic practices Dr. Rosemary Koeppel of Pediatrics said, "Reinforce handwashing for 20 seconds or the happy birthday song intermittently throughout the day along with utilization of alcohol wipes and hand sanitizers are a good start."

Vaccinations at recommended stages and ages

Pregnancy and vaccination

Recommended vaccines

  • Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine – a month prior to becoming pregnant.

  • Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) vaccine – during the third trimester of every pregnancy.

  • Yearly seasonal flu vaccine – by the end of October, if possible.

Infant and Toddler: Birth to Age 2

Recommended vaccines:

  • Chickenpox (varicella) vaccine – at 12 through 15 months

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP) vaccine – at 2, 4, 6, months and 15 through 18 months

  • Flu vaccine: every year by the end of October starting at 6 months

  • Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) vaccine – 2, 4, 6 months and if applicable based on brand 12 through 15 months

  • Hepatitis A vaccine – at 12 through 23 months and a second dose 6 months following the first dose

  • Hepatitis B vaccine – shortly after birth, at 1 through 2 months, and at 6 through 18 months

  • Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine – at 12 through 15 months, however infants 6 through 11 months old should have one dose of MMR vaccine before traveling abroad

  • Pneumococcal (PCV13) vaccine – at 2, 4, 6, and 12 through 15 months of age

  • Polio (IPV) vaccine – at 2, 4, and 6 through 8 months of age

  • Rotavirus (RV) vaccine – at 2 and 4 months (Rotarix brand) or 2, 4, and 6 months (RotaTeq brand)

Preschool and Elementary School Years Ages 3 through 10

You may need a certificate of immunization to enroll your child in school.

Recommended vaccines:

  • Chickenpox vaccine – at 4 through 6 years

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP) vaccine – at 4 through 6 years

  • Flu vaccine – every year by the end of October, if possible

  • Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine – at 4 through 6 years

  • Polio IPV vaccine – at 4 through 6 years

Preteen and Teen Years: Ages 11 through 18

Recommended vaccines:

  • Flu vaccine – every year by the end of October, if possible

  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine – at 11 through 12 years and a second dose 6- 12 months following the first dose

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine – at 11 through 12 years and at 16 years old

  • Serogroup B meningococcal vaccine – may be given at 16 through 23 years, if interested talk to your child’s doctor.

  • Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) vaccine – at 11 through 12 years.